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LINE-DANCING OVER TIME AND OVER THE WORLD

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WHAT IS LINE-DANCING?  

mostly  choreographed dance, repeated sequence of steps,  one or more rows/lines, execute steps at same time, performed repeatedly, country or Western music, facing each other or in same direction    often  not in physical contact with each other, popular, as opposed to performance  http://www.roots-boots.net/ldance/history.html

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LINE DANCERS DO

ENJOY MUSIC that reflects the level of comfort doing choreographed steps and corresponds to responses of movements and emotions.

EXPERIEINCE CAMARADERIE with strangers and/or friends in close yet individual space.                                                                          

KEEPTHE BEAT to four-count music with repeated steps mirrored by others.

FOCUS ON THE MUSIC, THE STEPS AND THEIR MOVEMENTS rather than anyone’s dress, ability, age, size, gender or culture.

LINE DANCERS' BENEFITS

ELEVATES ENTHUSIASM driven by a personally pleasurable style of music.

RELEASES REPRESSIONS of emotions, mental activity, physical motion or social anxiety.

REDUCES WEIGHT by dancing routinely.                

INCREASES COORDINATION by relieving stiff joints, better posture and more moveable joints.

PROVIDES SOCIAL OUTLET for those low on social availability or capacity.

RESEARCH

“It is probably even more effective to combine complex physical training with cognitive training.  Insofar, natural exercises such as regular dancing which affect physical, coordinative and cognitive functions, offer the maximum benefit to preserve and even improve physical and mental fitness in advanced age.Gajewski and Falkenstein, European Review of Aging and Physical Activity (2016) 13:1.

Participation in leisure activities is associated with a reduced risk of dementia, even after adjustment for base-line cognitive status and after the exclusion of subjects with possible preclinical  dementia.”  Verghese et al., Leisure Activities and the Risk of Dementia in the Elderly, New England Journal of Medicine (2003)348:2508-16.

“Millions of Americans dance, either recreationally or professionally. How many of those who are ballroom dancing, doing the foxtrot, break dancing, or line dancing, realize that they are doing something positive for their bodies—and their brains? Dance, in fact, has such beneficial effects on the brain that it is now being used to treat people with Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological movement disorder.”   http://www.berkeleywellness.com/fitness/active-lifestyle/article/many-health-benefits-dancing

Includes topics concerning general, specific conditions, and older people benefits of dance:  www.bupa.com  Keep dancing: the health and well-being of dance for older people (2011).

LINE-DANCING OVER TIME AND OVER THE WORLD