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Music House

Hawaii (Polynesia) Music & Culture

[Untitled]

Hawaiian drum-dance chant “Kau ka hali’a l ka manawa”, performed by Noenoe Lewis, drum, vocal, and Hau’oli Lewis, calls, dance from recording entitled Hawaiian Drum Dance Chants: Sounds of Power in Time.     Miller, Terry E. and Shahriari, Andres. World Music: A Global Journey. New York: Routledge, 2012

HAWAIIAN MUSICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guK5UgP9fgA(Hula Pahu, floor and leg drums, stamping tubes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hN_u0x-4q0Q&index=4&list=RDJ7NMxi3pjH8(slack-key, ukulele, falsetto, vibrato)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94i_QWDHYZ8(slack-key)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6z0ML5fPkBo(Hula Pahu, drums, stamping tubes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QA8oWS9mgo4(ipu heke drum)

https://youtu.be/7e3Ovl2Vivg?list=PLhVrLV6aDrByFrsGrur8wT_wBOi13pRTB(drums, portamento, falsetto, vibrato)

 

INSTRUMENTS

 

INSTRUMENTS CLASSICIFICATION

what vibrates for sound

 

TIMBRE

quality of sound

 

PITCH

tone measured in Hertz

 

RHYTHM

durations of sounds

PHONIC STRUCTURE

organizational relationship of sounds

DYNAMICS

volume measured in decibels

drum

(pahu)

membranophone

hand struck

 

 

irregular

according to text and dance

 

 

drum

(kilu)

 

 

slapping sound

 

 

 

 

stamping tube

(ka’eke’eke)

idiophone

hit ground

full, resonant

deep

 

 

 

gourd tube

(ipu heke)

idiophone

stacked two gourds

 

full, deep, resonant

 

 

 

 

voice

 mele, or chant

flowing; falsetto, a vocal technique with break between registers,  ha'iha'i

vibrato; portamento (alternate between two tones of minor third); syllabic text setting; vowel emphasis

 

 

 

steel guitar

 

chordophone

metal bar sliding down strings without pressure technique  J. Kekuku

sliding tone (portamento)

blending pitches; wide vibrato and harmonic overtones

low density; tempo moderate to slow

 

 

ukulele

“flying flea”         

chordophone

4 strings Portuguese guitar version

 

middle C lowest string of strings in same octave;

rapid plucking

12 to 17 frets (Western tuning)

 

slack-key guitar

(kî hô 'alu)

Spanish & Mexican cowboys

chordophone

loosened strings

 

altered tuning; open chords

rapid finger picking; hammer-on/pull-off techniques; chime effect for harmonic overtones

various tuning results in different open chords

 

HAWAIIAN CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS

Value Systems/Hierarchies

Traditional/Western

European and Hawaiian traditional influences

Identity

Drum-Dance

poetry in chant (mele pule)

Use/function

Drums/Power

drums used in dance represent spiritual power (mana) property of chiefs or priests

Spirituality

Animism/Christianity

change after European missionary influence

Ethics

Restrictions

missionaries forbad ancient dances and songs and replaced with Christian singing

Environment

Changed

tourist performances of Hawaiian traditional rituals through drum-dance

New Theories

Westernized

European influence and interaction

Technologies/Media

Adaptation

European instruments and business

Arts

Maintains Traditions

Hula Pahu, Hawaiian Dance Songs

Transmission/Pedagogy

Hymn singing

Hawaiian language continues through the singing of hîmeni (hymns) in many Christian churches

Notation System

Oral Tradition

mele chant

Composer/Player

Ancient

established rituals, ceremonies, events

Exchange/Adaptation

Adaptation/Inclusion

changed from feudal system with taboos (kapus) and animism to European political, social and economic systems

Cultural Intersection

Multiple

originally Marquesas Islands and Tahiti; English; Christian missionaries; America; Philippines, China, Japan

REFERENCES:    Miller, Terry E. and Shahriari, Andres. World Music: A Global Journey. New York: Routledge, 2012

                      http://www.folkways.si.edu/na-leo-hawaii/music/article/smithsonian