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Music House

Papua New Guinea (Melanesia) Music & Culture

Papua New Guinea Picture

Susap,"Badra from Buzi." performed by Amadu. Miller, Terry E. and Shahriari, Andres. World Music: A Global Journey. New York: Routledge, 2012

PAPUA NEW GUINEA MUSICAL CONSIDERATIONS 

RECORDINGS:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aUAYLOABO8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFL0f6knC3Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwFHNRjC5WA&list=PLD0m-i-F7aEqRiLXAMKNX7vL0y-t8KXeO&index=2

 

INSTRUMENTS

INSTRUMENTS CLASSICIFICATION

what vibrates for sound

TIMBRE

quality of sound

PITCH

tone measured in Hertz

RHYTHM

durations of sounds

PHONIC STRUCTURE

organizational relationship of sounds

DYNAMICS

volume measured in decibels

slit drums (garamut)

membranophone hollow,struck with sticks

 varies with size and shape 

hourglass-shaped drums (kundu)

 membranophone   hollow,struck with sticks

largest drum(diwaka)

 membranophone hollow,struck with sticks

bamboo mouth harp (susap)

idiophone   (lamellophone or linguaphone) plucked

 

twangy

 

overtones, speech induced

altered by tembral changes, long/short patterns

vocal range

accented low tone

echo overtone

voice, flutes, tubes

 voice, aerophones  direct air

 PAPAUA NEW GUINEA CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS

Value Systems/Hierarchies

some overlap of male and female roles

use of susap to maintain social relationships between young men and women

Identity

clans

 

Use/function

usually private

use susap as a “speech surrogate to disguise against eavesdroppers and in courting rituals to attract women’s attention; garamut used to convey messages over laree distances

Spirituality

traditional and imported

susap considered possessing love-controlling magic

Environment

 

moutainous

Papua New Guinea consists of eastern New Guinea along with New Britain, New Ireland, Bougainville, and six hundred small islands and archipelagoes. The western half of the island is the Indonesian province of Irian Jaya.

New Theories

added to traditional rituals/stories

modern instruments now used

Technologies/Media

performances

tourists

Arts

costume

communal dancing

Exchange/Adaptation

many contributors

Australian Aboriginal populations; British; Christian missionaries

Cultural Intersection

clans meet

Singsings: several villages celebrate ethnic makeup and foster exchange and clan competition

 REFERENCE:   Miller, Terry E. and Shahriari, Andres. World Music: A Global Journey. New York: Routledge, 2012